Exercise 2 - Trot and pop


Place the trot and landing pole between 2.75m and 3 metres depending on the size of your horse’s stride.

I use 3 metres in this video.

  • Trotting into fences gives the horse and rider more time to read the fence. This will give the horse confidence in their approach.

  • This can reduce rushing into the fence. Repetition over a period of time is key. The period of time will vary depending on how your horse responds to the training.

  • Do not do this exercise more than twice a week and each session should be kept short

  • Always finish on a good note.

  • In trot horses have to use their hind legs evenly and push off therefore creating more hind strength.

  • I do this exercise across the short side of the school so that the horse doesn’t see a long distance into and after the fence which could encourage rushing.

  • Being across the short side makes it easier to work them from their hind legs as you can balance on the turns.

  • Ensure your horse approaches in an active trot, keeping the rhythm all the way to the fence. Keep your elbows elastic and keep your contact to the bit into, over and away from the fence.

  • If you drop the contact into the fence your horse may chip in or stop.

  • If you drop your contact on landing they may rush off, and you will not be prepared for the next fence.

  • They could also trip on landing.

  • If your approach or departure from the fence is crooked then use poles as guidelines.(as demonstrated).

  • Keep your legs on. Make sure your body does not get ahead of your horse as this will reduce their ability to open their shoulders.

  • Do not drive the horse with your seat as this will make them rush and block their back.

  • Wait for the fence to come to you, don’t chase into it.

  • On landing make a transition onto a circle or halt after the fence so that your horse learns not to rush on.

  • In this video I ride an experienced horse and when necessary he is clever and quick in sorting his feet at the trot pole. This is an important lesson for all horses.